1-02 Sexual Assault, Violence, and Harassment

SECTIONS ON THIS PAGE

  • Statistics on Child Abuse, Sexual Assault, and Violence
  • World Health Organization (WHO): Global Statistics and Resources
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): US Statistics and Resources
  • Black Women’s Blueprint: American Black Women’s Statistics
  • State-by-State Laws on Abuse and Violence: RAINN and Child Welfare Information Gateway [RAINN includes consent laws]
  • Mangy Jay’s Analysis of Steven Pinker’s Misrepresentation of Rape Statistics in The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence has Declined
  • Sexual Harassment and Hostile Work Environment

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Statistics on Child Abuse, Sexual Assault, and Violence

In looking for research on child abuse/neglect, sexual assault, and forms of violence, I have sought sources statistics for both US and global situations, women and men, adults and children, and other demographics such as race/ethnicity and economic status. I have selected some sources with broad governmental support, and others that represent specific demographic groups.

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World Health Organization (WHO):

Global Statistics and Resources

The WHO website has an extensive resource section on Violence Prevention. It has such subsections as: information on the WHO Violence Prevention Unit, related WHO programs, Violence Prevention in WHO world regions, Publications and Resources (reports, strategies and action plans, other kinds of documents — most issued in multiple languages), Campaigns and Initiatives, and Events.

There is also a Violence Prevention Topics section, which links to pages with data and publications on the following issues:

Child maltreatment

Violence against children

Youth violence

Intimate partner and sexual violence

Elder abuse

Violence against health workers

Collective violence

Self-directed violence

For some research done on global statistics, see a June 20, 2013, article from WHO, Violence against women: a ‘global health problem of epidemic proportions’. Findings reported included the following:

Physical or sexual violence is a public health problem that affects more than one third of all women globally, according to a new report released by WHO in partnership with the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the South African Medical Research Council.

The report, Global and regional estimates of violence against women: Prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence, represents the first systematic study of global data on the prevalence of violence against women – both by partners and non-partners. Some 35% of all women will experience either intimate partner or non-partner violence. The study finds that intimate partner violence is the most common type of violence against women, affecting 30% of women worldwide. [Emphasis added.]

Related documents from this major 2013 study, and other resources:

Infographic: Violence Against Women: Global Picture Health Response.

Report: Global and regional estimates of violence against women: Prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence. PDF of full report in English. (57 pages). PDFs of Executive Summary in Spanish and Executive Summary in French (2 pages).

Report: Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women: WHO clinical and policy guidelines. PDF of full report in English, in Spanish, and in French.

Handbook:  Health care for women subjected to intimate partner violence or sexual violence: A clinical handbook. PDFs in English, in Spanish, and in French.

Additional WHO documents from 2004 to present related to child abuse, sexual assault, and violence — reports, statistics, response plans, and public health systems.

For information on global prevention efforts, see the Global status report on violence prevention 2014.

The Global status report on violence prevention 2014, which reflects data from 133 countries, is the first report of its kind to assess national efforts to address interpersonal violence, namely child maltreatment, youth violence, intimate partner and sexual violence, and elder abuse.

Jointly published by WHO, the United Nations Development Programme, and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, the report reviews the current status of violence prevention efforts in countries, and calls for a scaling up of violence prevention programmes; stronger legislation and enforcement of laws relevant for violence prevention; and enhanced services for victims of violence.

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

US Statistics and Resources

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has an extensive resource section on Violence Prevention. This includes sections on:

Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention

Elder Abuse

Intimate Partner Violence

Sexual Violence

Suicide

Youth Violence

Funded Programs and Initiatives

Each section typically includes definitions, statistical information, strategy plans, and various other kinds of resource publications (fact sheets, infographics, articles, reports, etc.). Many of the documents and downloads are available in both English and Spanish editions.

For a compilation of statistics for various US demographics, see the CDC’s Sexual Violence Facts at a Glance data sheet. At this time (spring 2018), the most recent edition available is from 2012, based on extensive prior research. This data sheet includes sections of statistics on: Adults; College Age; Children and Youth; Perpetrators; and Non-fatal Injuries, Medical Treatment,and Health Conditions. In most sections, there are statistics for both females and males. Only the Health Disparities section breaks down statistics by racial/ethnic background. There is also a Reference section with a list of source reports for the statistics.

For additional statistics and analysis on sexual assault and violence, see the CDC Funded Programs and Initiatives section on The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey:

The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) is an ongoing survey that collects the most current and comprehensive national- and state-level data on intimate partner violence, sexual violence and stalking victimization in the United States. CDC developed NISVS to collect data on these important public health problems and enhance violence prevention efforts.

At this time (Spring 2018), the most recent statistical information was published in 2017, based on extensive NISVS research and reports from 2010-2012:

The Summary Reports link gives several kinds of documents (full reports, fact sheet, brochure, executive summary, infographic) on national and state victimization estimates for intimate partner violence, sexual violence, and stalking. Note that the NISVS Infographic gives key statistics for both men and women on sexual violence, physical violence, and stalking; it also includes some statistics on both adults and minors.

Special Reports are available on: Intimate Partner Violence, Findings on Victimization by Sexual Orientation, and Sexual Violence in Youth.

The FAQs page includes sections on General Questions about the NISVS, Backgrounds and Methods, Interpreting NISVS Results, Implications of Findings, and Limitations of this Report.

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Black Women’s Blueprint:

American Black Women’s Statistics

I’ve been aware of long-standing general estimates that one out of three girls will be the victims of sexual abuse before age 18. But I learned of specific research and statistics about Black women in America from my friend Lyvonne Picou’s post, It’s Not a Scandal, It’s a System.

The Black Women’s Blueprint has an ongoing study that found 60% of Black women are sexually abused before they turn 18-years-old. Sixty. Percent. And, since the Black church is 85% women, that means that half of Black church congregations have been sexually abused. [Emphasis added.]

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State-by-State Laws on Abuse and Violence:

RAINN and Child Welfare Information Gateway

RAINN (Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network

The RAINN State Law Database offers information in the following topics:

  1. Rape and Sexual Assault Crime Definitions.
  2. Consent – determining consent.
  3. Mandatory Reporting – known or suspected abuse (1) of children, (2) of elderly or disabled.
  4. Criminal Statutes of Limitations.
  5. Termination of Rapists’ Parental Rights – limits on rapists’ parental rights.
  6. Confidentiality Laws – confidentiality protections.
  7. HIV/AIDS Testing of Sex Offenders – HIV/AIDS testing requirements.

For more details, plus instructions on how to research topics on that site, see the section on RAINN State Law Database on page 1-01 Child Abuse, Neglect, and Sexual Abuse.

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Child Welfare Information Gateway

The Child Welfare Information Gateway offers information on the following categories and topics:

CATEGORIES. The Child Welfare Information Gateway has a portal page with the option of accessing PDFs of important national and state-by-state resources on relevant topics related to minors. Under this State Resources tab are ways to access information in four sub-categories:

  1. State and Tribal Child Welfare Policy.
  2. Child Abuse and Neglect. (This section includes checkboxes and links to access such topics as: Clergy as Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect, Definitions of Child Abuse and Neglect, and Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect.)
  3. Child Welfare.
  4. Adoption.

TOPICS. The topics most relevant to this website is likely the set found in the Child Abuse and Neglect category. Those topics are:

  • Child Witnesses to Domestic Violence
  • Clergy as Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Cross-Reporting Among Responders to Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Definitions of Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Definitions of Domestic Violence
  • Definitions of Human Trafficking
  • Disclosure of Confidential Child Abuse and Neglect Records
  • Establishment and Maintenance of Central Registries for Child Abuse Reports
  • Immunity for Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Making and Screening Reports of Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Mandatory Reporters of Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Parental Drug Use as Child Abuse
  • Penalties for Failure to Report and False Reporting of Child Abuse and Neglect
  • Representation of Children in Child Abuse and Neglect Proceedings
  • Review and Expunction of Central Registries and Reporting Records

For more details, plus instructions on how to research topics on that site, see the section on Child Welfare Information Gateway on page 1-01 Child Abuse, Neglect, and Sexual Abuse.

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Mangy Jay’s Analysis of Steven Pinker’s Misrepresentation

of Rape Statistics in The Better Angels of Our Nature:

Why Violence has Declined

This extended Twitter thread by @magi_jay addresses highly flawed presentation of statistics of rape in The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence has Declined, by Steven Pinker. Her overall conclusion is that his work on this issue “was riddled w/ bad analyses, cherry-picked data, and, in many regards, TERRIBLE sourcing.” Her critique shows how to investigate and analyze such faulty arguments, taking them apart layer by layer, link by link.

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Sexual Harassment and Hostile Work Environment

Information to be added.

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